Manson: The Life and Times of Charles Manson

 

Nothing quite warms you up during the holiday season like a nice fire, a cup of hot chocolate, and a good book about some of the most brutal murders in the 20th century.

Yes, some of us have a slightly different idea of what constitutes good leisure time. Or maybe this is just more appropriate Festivus reading than Christmas reading. But who really cares, anyway. A good book is a good book. I must say, despite never having read any other books about Charles Manson, I really don’t feel the need to read any others after this. Jeff Guinn is a truly engaging writer, and the 60s really come alive in this story of death and delusion.

I found that actually to be one of the most compelling parts of the book. We can always get a much better grasp on people’s thoughts and actions when we have an understanding of what was going on in the world around them, and thanks to far more than just these murders themselves, the 60s were an incredibly turbulent time in history. Without going off on long tangents that feel irrelevant to the main point, here we can become fully immersed in the atmosphere of the time, warts and all. Whether you lived through a certain period or not, there’s a real tendency to romanticize and look back on times past as being idyllic, better than the time we’re living in now. The 60s in particular can really fall victim to this, as we envision Woodstock, peace and love, and a virtually unlimited supply of weed. How could such an environment possibly spawn such a dark dude? But there’s no nostalgia here, only raw, honest truth. This is one of those books that take you on a mental road trip back in time, but doesn’t bore you with tours about shit you don’t care about.

This fair and well-rounded approach isn’t exclusive to the 60s, but also to Manson himself. I’m not saying that the book is sympathetic to him. That would be insane. But Guinn does do what he can to explain just how such a person could grow up to become what he did. The amount of research this involves is impressive, but the book is never bogged down by dry facts. We almost want to feel sorry for the guy, at least when he was still a kid. His life was far from easy. But when it really comes down to it, nothing is an excuse. There are of course innumerable people who have had it worse and didn’t turn out to be bad people at all, and really, Manson seems like the kind of person who was just plain born bad. Disappointed as they were, his family from what we can tell didn’t seem all that surprised to hear of what he had done.

The big question for me then, is what Manson himself truly believed. He spent a lot of time telling other people what to believe, including that he was the second coming of Jesus, but did he know it was all bullshit, or was he really just that delusional? The answer doesn’t seem to be found here, and maybe it’s something we’re just not meant to know. It’s a mystery that will ensure as long as the memory of those horrible crimes.

Rather just see the movie? Check out Helter Skelter.

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2 thoughts on “Manson: The Life and Times of Charles Manson

  1. Daniel Simone & Heidi Jordan Ley are soon to publish The Retrial of Charles Manson, the first book corroborated and endorsed by the man himself. It is also the very first story on Manson that is not a series of excerpts from Helter Skelter or a duplication of it, and it’s written in a cinematic, suspenseful novel-like style. This version will overwhelm the reader with never-before-told explosive content, including documented specifics of Vincent Bugliosi’s misdeeds, lies, his coercions of unwilling witnesses, and the fabrication of evidence for which he was indicted for.

    In this book, you’ll learn new facts surrounding the Charles Manson Affair, controversial details and particulars that Mr. Simone and Ms. Ley support with irrefutable documentation and public records. Moreover, The Retrial of Charles Manson sets forth and exposes in great details Mr. Bugliosi’s scrapes with the law, a scandalous misconduct that he has managed to suppress for the past 43 years. Very Interesting!

  2. […] Manson: The Life and Times of Charles Manson, finished Dec 27th. […]

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